Analysis Tag

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An analysis of data from a previous study of more than 1,350 smokers intending to quit after a hospitalization- By Sue McGreevey | March 26th, 2018 found that those who reported using electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) during the study period were less likely to have successfully quit smoking six months after entering the study. The authors caution, however, that because of the study’s design, it cannot support the conclusion that e-cigarettes are not useful smoking cessation aids and stress the need to further investigate that question. “Study participants who used e-cigarettesRead More
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It has been claimed that just 10 puffs on an e-cigarette is enough to trigger physiological changes that can lead to heart disease. By Spectator Health Reporter | December 6th, 2016 Researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm say that inhaling e-cig vapour leads to a ‘rapid rise’ in levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), which is indicative of damage to the inner lining of blood vessels, which can cause hardening of the arteries. During the study, which has been published in the journal Atherosclerosis, the researchers examined 16 ‘occasionalRead More
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According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse, the 2015 Monitoring the Future (MTF) analysis of e-cigarette usage suggests some teens are using the e-cig devices to inhale marijuana, rather than nicotine. By DenverIjournal | September 14th, 2016 University of Michigan researchers found that at least 6 percent of teens use their e-cig vaporizers for marijuana. In the MTF survey funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health, researchers surveyed students, grades 8, 10 and 12. Around 6 percent said they don’t know whatRead More
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The vapour from electronic cigarettes includes not only the carcinogens formaldehyde and acrolein, but also probable carcinogens like propylene oxide and glycidol- Rebecca Trager | August 1st, 2016 according to a new analysis by a group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in the US. The researchers discovered that the thermal decomposition of two common solvents in e-liquids that are vaporised by e-cigarettes – propylene glycol and glycerine – leads to emissions of significant levels of 31 harmful chemical compounds. There have been ongoing debates about whether cigarette smokers should be encouraged to switch to e-cigarettesRead More